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DIY hand sanitizer

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2 years 3 months ago #5297 by mw0uzo
Replied by mw0uzo on topic DIY hand sanitizer
Petrol and white spirit mix?

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2 years 3 months ago #5303 by Simomax
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Don't drink Isopropyl Alcohol, or bleach! :sick:

Things That Do Not Cure COVID-19 If Ingested

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2 years 3 months ago #5311 by mw0uzo
Replied by mw0uzo on topic DIY hand sanitizer
LOL I love the in depth explanation for things that obviously should not be done

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2 years 3 months ago #5312 by Simomax
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You say that, but people do stupid stuff! He makes for some very interesting videos. Almost making entertainment from medical articles.

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2 years 3 months ago - 2 years 3 months ago #5447 by Simomax
Replied by Simomax on topic DIY hand sanitizer
My latest recipe to try (once I am able to.)

For 100ml, scale up as necessary

75ml Isopropyl Alcohol
20ml Water (pref. distilled, deionized or RO)
5ml Glycerine
20 drops Aloe Vera liquid
10 drops Vitamin E oil
7 drops Tea Tree oil

I have been using what I made in the original recipe since I made it. I have had no adverse effects from it at all, except ever so slightly dry hands if I don't also wash them often. So, using frequently and washing frequently it has been great, but just using the sanitizer and not washing for a few hours does make my hands feel a little dry.
So after more research it seems glycerine is a key ingredient for moisturizing skin so I think with my new recipe and slightly less alcohol it should still work as well and not feel as dry.

Also, using it to clean surfaces works (well I'm assuming it does with the alcohol....), but does leave a residue. I plan on making a 70/30 or 75/25 alcohol/water mix without the softeners just for surfaces to use on things like door handles etc. I read something somewhere, and I think FSM19 mentioned it, about more than 70% evaporating too fast that it lowers its effectiveness. It seems this is true, and also that 70/30 is nearly as effective as 100% but is cheaper to manufacture. There are a few reasons for 70/30, and 70% alcohol is generally accepted as being effective.
Last edit: 2 years 3 months ago by Simomax.

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2 years 3 months ago - 2 years 3 months ago #5466 by GetSirius
Replied by GetSirius on topic DIY hand sanitizer
Three articles about alcohol percentage:

www.apartmenttherapy.com/isopropyl-alcoh...isinfecting-36723904



cleanroomsuppliesltd.com/blog/ipa-isopro...-alcohol-selectioin/

70% or 99% IPA – Which Work Best in a Cleanroom Environment?
In pharmaceutical cleanroom environments, alcohol is blended with water for injection quality water (WFI).

Water speeds up the denaturing process of proteins, causing membrane damage. Alcohols act on bacteria by making the cell membranes permeable. Efficacy is increased with the presence of water which leads to cytoplasm leakage, denaturation of cell protein and eventual cell lysis.

The optimum concentration for disinfection purposes is between 60%-90% solution in water v/v. Typically 70% solutions are used. Higher concentrations of alcohol are in fact less effective at killing bacteria.



blog.gotopac.com/2017/05/15/why-is-70-is...hol_for_Disinfection

Isopropyl alcohol, particularly in solutions between 60% and 90% alcohol with 10 – 40% purified water, is rapidly antimicrobial against bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Once alcohol concentrations drop below 50%, usefulness for disinfection drops sharply. Notably, higher concentrations of alcohol don’t generate more desirable bactericidal, virucidal, or fungicidal properties.

The presence of water is a crucial factor in destroying or inhibiting the growth of pathogenic microorganisms with isopropyl alcohol. Water acts as a catalyst and plays a key role in denaturing the proteins of vegetative cell membranes. 70% IPA solutions penetrate the cell wall more completely which permeates the entire cell, coagulates all proteins, and therefore the microorganism dies. Extra water content slows evaporation, therefore increasing surface contact time and enhancing effectiveness. Isopropyl alcohol concentrations over 91% coagulate proteins instantly. Consequently, a protective layer is created which protects other proteins from further coagulation.

Solutions > 91% IPA do kill bacteria, but sometimes require longer contact times for disinfection, and enable spores to lie in a dormant state without being killed. In this analysis, a 50% isopropyl alcohol solution kills Staphylococcus Aureus in less than 10 seconds (pg. 238), yet a 90% solution with a contact time of over two hours is ineffective. Some disinfectants will kill spores with exposures times that exceed 3-12 hours, which are classified as chemical sterilants. So why do higher alcohol solutions yield fewer results for bactericidal and antimicrobial outcomes?

Mineral Point radiation/lightning monitor: getsirius.com/radiation
Last edit: 2 years 3 months ago by GetSirius.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Simomax, FSM19

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