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7 years 7 months ago #2583 by bethsalem
These American sites might be worth a look

https://emergency.cdc.gov/radiation/ki.asp

and

http://www.thyroid.org/wp-content/uploads/patients/brochures/NuclearRadiation_brochure.pdf

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7 years 6 months ago #2642 by AstroW
I have asked a few people about this but clearly no one can point me to the source. I keep getting the same answers already stated above.
I have one last source to ask; my sister who works with biomedicin can perhaps dig something up.

Regards
Petter

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7 years 4 months ago #2763 by AstroW
Next semester I will study things like Radiation biology and Medical terminology. Perhaps there will be an answer to previous question after all. But nevertheless please ask any radiation related question you might have and I will do my best to answer it.
Happy new year to all radmon users out there.

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7 years 4 months ago - 7 years 4 months ago #2764 by Nudnik
There seem to be new findings. Analysing the data regarding Thyroid cancer in the Ukraine/Chernobyl there seems to be a significant raise int the cancer rate regardless which age. Even people above 60...

Here is a source: https://www.ippnw.de/atomenergie/sicherheit/artikel/de/ippnw-empfehlung-bei-atomreaktorunf.html (sorry only in german)
Last edit: 7 years 4 months ago by Nudnik. Reason: added a better link
The following user(s) said Thank You: Gamma-Man

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7 years 4 months ago - 7 years 4 months ago #2769 by Bert490
Although I have not read the article, I recently learned that Thyroxine, which is one of the most important thyroid hormones, is used in many places in the body. Each hormone molecule has 4 Iodine atoms, so Iodine is critical to its production. Thyroxine is important for development, and a lack of it in young people leads to developmental problems, including brain development. This is likely the basis for supplying Iodine pills to those under 40. However it is also affects heart rate, breathing rate, basal metabolic rate, sympathetic activity, and metabolism of proteins and carbohydrates, all of which are *not* age dependent ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thyroid_hormones ). So if any of these varied pathways does not perfectly recycle Iodine back to the Thyroid gland, a constant resupply is required, regardless of age.

So it appears to me that any government policy that denies Iodine tablets to adults over 40 is weighed more towards cost and logistics (or out-dated data) than protecting all citizens. Nudnik's new findings seem to support this.
Last edit: 7 years 4 months ago by Bert490.

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7 years 4 months ago #2770 by Nudnik
From a report I found:

Among older adults, despite there is little risk of thyroid cancer and non negligible risk of complications from KI, it seems that there is still benefit in providing KI for adults over 40 years old. To be most effective, KI must be taken within a few hours before or after exposure to inhaled or ingested radioiodine.

Source: https://ec.europa.eu/energy/sites/ener/files/documents/165.pdf page 25

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